Israeli children-Data for International Child Day 2011
Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs
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 Israeli children-Data for International Child Day 2011

11/23/2011

At the end of 2010 there were 2.52 million children (aged 0-17) in Israel, accounting for approximately a third of the state's population.

 

(Communicated by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics)

Selected data:

• At the end of 2010 there were 2.52 million children (aged 0-17) in Israel, accounting for approximately a third of the state's population.

• In Jerusalem, Israel's largest city, the proportion of children is approximately 40%; in Tel Aviv-Yafo and Haifa, children comprise only approximately a fifth of the city's population.

• Approximately 96% of all Jewish children were born in Israel. Approximately 79% of them are children of fathers who were also born in Israel.

• In 2010, approximately 166,000 babies were born in Israel; of these, approximately 120,700 to Jewish women and approximately 36,200 to Moslem women.

• The average number of children aged up to 17 per household (for households with children in this age group) was highest in Bnei Brak 3.5 and in Jerusalem - 3.1, compared with the national average - 2.4.

• The percentage of Jewish children in lone-parent families stood at 9%, compared with 5% of Arab children in families of this type. Among children of immigrants from the former USSR, the proportion of children living in lone-parent families was 15%.

• Out of approximately 186,000 youths aged 15-17 - 92.0% studied, 2.0% worked and did not study, and 6.0% did not study or work.

• A rise in the number of children in schools of the ultra-Orthodox stream: in the 2009/10 school year children under ultra-Orthodox Supervision at the primary level constituted 28% of Jewish education; compared with 1999/00 in which they constituted approximately 20%. In the upper levels, the pupils of the ultra-Orthodox education in the 2009/10 school year constituted approximately 20%, compared with 1999/00 in which they constituted approximately 15%.

• In 2009/10, 906 children (aged 14-17) studied towards a first degree in institutions of higher education in Israel.

• As in 2009, the most common names among Jews were "Noam" for boys and "Noa" for girls. The name "Noa" has been the most popular among girls for more than a decade. The most significant change in the list of girls' names was the place of the name "Tahel", which rose from 45 in 2009 to 12 in 2010; and "Ayala", which rose from 30 to 14.


Additional data

• At the end of 2010 there were 2.52 million children (aged 0-17) in Israel, accounting for approximately a third of the state's population. Of these, approximately 1.759 million were Jewish children, 678,500 were Arab children (594,000 Moslems, 47,000 Druze and approximately 37,000 Arab Christians), and a further 74,000 were designated as "other" (having no religious affiliation in the Population Registry and non-Arab Christians).

Proportion of children (age 0 -17) in the population

• Children comprised approximately 44% of the Arab population, compared with 30% of the Jewish population and 23% of others. These differences stem primarily from differences in the fecundity levels: an Arab woman gives birth on average to approximately 3.5 children during her life, while the average among Jewish women is approximately 3 children, and among others - approximately 1.7.

• The number of boys was 63,000 larger than that of girls (age 0-17); approximately 1.292 million were boys, and approximately 1.228 million were girls.

• Out of the 2.52 million children in Israel, 31% were age 0-4, 28.4% - age 5-9, 26% - age 10-14, and 14.4% - age 15-17.

Children, by geographical district and type of locality

• Approximately 581,000 children lived in the Central District, and approximately 448,000 in the Northern District.

• In the Jerusalem District, Northern District, Southern District and the region of Judea and Samaria (the West Bank), the children accounted for a higher proportion of the total district population than their proportion of Israel's overall population (32.7%).

• In Jerusalem, Israel's largest city, the proportion of children was approximately 40%; in Tel Aviv-Yafo and Haifa, children comprised only approximately a fifth of the city's population.

• In Jewish urban localities with a high concentration of young families, established in recent decades, such as Modi'in-Maccabim-Re'ut and Shoham, the percentage of children is similar to that of Jerusalem (approximately 40%).

• In the rural settlements types of localities (localities numbering less than 2,000 residents) the percentage of children stands at 36%; in community localities there is a high concentration of young families and the percentage of children is high (approximately 44%). In kibbutzim there is a high concentration of adults, with the share of children reaching only approximately 28%; in moshavim the percentage of children stands at 34%.  

Children up to age 17 in households[1] and families[2]

• In 2010, there were approximately 982,000 households with children, containing 2,363,000 children aged 0-17. These households accounted for approximately 45% of all households in Israel. Among Jewish households, approximately 41% contained children (approximately 741,000), compared with 69% in the Arab sector (approximately 218,000).

• In a comparison of Israel's large cities (over 100,000 inhabitants), it was found that over half of the households in Bnei Brak and Jerusalem contained children up to age 17 (53% in Bnei Brak and approximately 51% in Jerusalem). Tel Aviv-Yafo had the lowest percentage of households with children up to age 17 - 24%.

• Approximately 8% of children lived as single children in the family (without any siblings living at home). The proportion of Jewish children living as single children in the family was approximately 9%, compared with approximately 3% of Arab children. The percentage of single children was particularly high among immigrants from the former USSR - 23%.

Children living with a pair of parents or with a lone parent

• Most children in Israel lived with two parents (92% of the children). Approximately 185,000, comprising approximately 8% of the children, lived with only one parent. Most children living in a lone-parent family lived with their mother (91%).

• Among Jewish children in lone-parent families, 60% lived with a divorced parent, 14% with a single parent, 16% with a lone married parent living apart from the spouse, and an additional approximately 10% with a widowed parent. Among Arab children in lone-parent families, 28% lived with a widowed parent, 39% with a married parent living apart from the spouse, and 29% with a divorced parent.


Employment

State of employment in households with children

• In 2010, 11.3% of all children up to age 17 (approximately 267,000) lived in households without employed persons.

Work and studies among those aged 15-17

• Out of approximately 186,000 male youths aged 15-17 - 92.0% studied, 2.0% worked and did not study, while 6.0% neither worked nor studied. Out of approximately 177,000 female youths aged 15-17 - 93.6% studied, 0.9% worked and did not study, while 5.5% neither worked nor studied.

• Among Jews aged 15-17 (approximately 258,000), 3.9% neither studied nor worked - 4.5% of the boys and 3.2% of the girls. Among Arabs of the same age (99,700), 10.5% neither studied nor worked - 9.7% of the boys and 11.4% of the girls.


Welfare

Children (aged 0-17) registered with social services departments[3]

• In 2010, approximately 17% (440,000) of all children up to age 17 in Israel's population were registered with the social services departments of the local authorities in Israel.

• 52% of all children aged 0-17 registered with the social services departments are boys (similar to their rate within the overall population, which stands at 51%).

• Approximately 63% of them are Jews and 33% are Arabs (70% and 27% are children up to age 17 in both groups, respectively, in the overall population).

• Over a quarter of the children (27%) registered with the welfare services live in lone-parent families, compared to 8% of children in the overall population.

• Neediness was defined for 39% of the registered children[4]. The rest of the children are not needy themselves, but belong to families in which at least one person is defined as such.

• Among children defined as needy, 42% belong to families with 6 or more people, and 21% in families with up to 3 persons.


Education, culture and sport

Primary and secondary education

• In the 2009/10 school year, approximately 877,545 pupils studied in primary education in approximately 2,560 educational institutions; of them approximately 72% in the Hebrew sector and the rest in the Arab sector. The number of pupils in primary education rose in the last decade by approximately 18% (compared with 740,280 pupils in the 1999/00 school year).

• A noteworthy phenomenon can be perceived in the rise of the population in the ultra-Orthodox stream: in the 2009/10 school year pupils under ultra-Orthodox supervision at the primary level constituted 28% of Hebrew Education, compared with 1999/00 in which they constituted approximately 20%. In the upper levels, in 2009/10 pupils of ultra-Orthodox education constituted approximately 20%, compared with 1999/00 in which they constituted approximately 15%.

• In the 2009/10 school year, 144,577 children began their education in Grade 1. Approximately 83% of them were aged 6, and approximately 17% were aged 5.

Pre-primary education

• In the 2009/10 school year, 478,250 children attended public kindergartens and day-care centers, and 68,189 children attended private kindergartens. Approximately 71% of all children aged 2-5 attended public kindergartens and day-care centers, and a not inconsiderable share of those aged 6 attended public kindergartens - 15% (20,510 children). 

Active athletes

• In the 2008/09 school year there were 8,638 active athletes aged 7-17 in the various personal sports branches. These constitute 64% of all active athletes in personal sports branches in all age groups.

• Out of all athletes in this age group, 51% are boys and 49% are girls.

• The highest number of active athletes in this age range is aged 12 - 1,518 active athletes, that constitute 18% of all active athletes in this age group.

• The branch with the highest number of active athletes in this age group is tennis (1,645 athletes, that constitute 19% of all athletes in this age group), artistic gymnastics (1,292 athletes, 15%) and gymnastics (1,237 athletes, 14%).

Entitlement to matriculation certificate

The percentage of twelfth-grade students entitled to a matriculation certificate in 2010 reached 56%. In Hebrew education the number of entitled was higher than in Arabic education- 58% versus 48%. The rate of entitlement among girls was higher than that among boys; in Hebrew education- 63% versus 53%, and in Arabic education the gap was even greater - 56% versus 38%, respectively.

An analysis conducted in 2009, of success patterns in matriculation examinations by size of family, shows differences based on the family's religious affiliation and the framework in which its children study.

In Hebrew education under state supervision, a steady decline is perceived in the entitlement rate, beginning with pupils from families with 4 children. Thus, from 72% entitlement to matriculation among pupils from families with 1-3 children, to 66% among pupils from families with 4 children, and to 37% among pupils from families with 6 children and more.

On the other hand, in state-religious supervision, the rates of entitlement are stable even among pupils from larger families that had 4 or 5 children, and a decline is perceived only among pupils from families with 6 children and more; from 73% among pupils from families with up to 5 children, to 64% among pupils from families with 6 or more children.

In the ultra-Orthodox supervision the rates of entitlement are low but stable, and decline significantly only among pupils from families with 6 children and more; from 15-17% among pupils from families with 5 children to 6% among pupils from families with 6 children or more.

In Arabic education the rates of entitlement are stable and declining, beginning with pupils from families with 5 children; from 49% among pupils from families with up to 4 children, to 46% among pupils from families with 4 children.


Higher education and science

Students in academic colleges of education

• In the 2010/11 school year there were 26,908 first-degree students in academic colleges of education, in six study streams, of which 4,067 students were in the kindergarten and early-childhood stream, 4,896 students in the grades 3-6 stream, and 8,083 students in the grades 7-10 stream.

Students aged 14-17 studying towards a first degree in higher education institutions

• In the 2009/10  school year 906 children (aged 14-17) studied towards a first degree in higher education institutions in Israel; of which 261 studied at universities, 499 studied at the Open University and 146 in academic colleges.

• The main subjects studied at the universities and academic colleges were computer sciences (171 students), mathematics (144 students), Physics (16 students), History of Islamic Countries (11 students) and Music (10 students).

• 25.7% of students at the universities were females, at the Open University their share was 38.9%, and at academic colleges 20.5%.


Data from the Househole Expenditure Survey for 2010

Expenditures of households with children

The Household Expenditures Survey for 2010 sampled 6,168 households representing more than two million households in the population, out of which 45% represent households with children and 55% represent households without children.

• The average monthly monetary expenditure (expenditure on consumption excluding estimate of expenditure on housing and household-owned vehicles) for a household with children was NIS 12,282, compared to which the net monetary income of a household with children was NIS 14,205 per month. The number of breadwinners in households with children was 1.6 compared with one breadwinner in households without children.

• A household with children spends on average a higher percentage of its consumption basket on education, culture and entertainment (15.4% of the consumption basket), on food (16.8%), furniture and household equipment (4.3%) and on clothing and footwear (3.5%), than does a household without children.

Monthly expenditure on consumption in households with children and households without children


Households without Children Households with Children

Expenditure
(NIS)
% Expenditure
(NIS)
%
Total expenditure on consumption 11,473 100.0 15,948 100.0
Food 1,809 15.8 2,686 16.8
Housing 3,234 28.2 3,558 22.3
Home and household maintenance 1,093 9.5 1,527 9.6
Home furniture and equipment 348 3.0 680 4.3
Clothing and footwear 317 2.8 561 3.5
Health 702 6.1 640 4.0
Education, culture and entertainment 1,101 9.6 2,464 15.4
Transportation and communications 2,372 20.7 3,068 19.2
Other products and services 498 4.3 765 4.8

 

Expenditure on education services in households with children, by quintiles:

• A household with children in the top quintile (from among all households sorted by net income per standard person) spends each month an average of more than 6 times more on payment for kindergartens than a household in the bottom quintile, and 10 times as much on extra-curricular activities. The gaps between households with children in the different quintiles shrink for expenditures on compulsory education frameworks.


Jewish names

In 2010 there were no significant changes in the distribution of names among those born during the present year, compared to the previous year. As in 2009, the most popular names among Jews were Noam for boys and Noa for girls. The name Noa is the most prevalent among girls in the past decade; 3.2% were called by this name in 2010, less than in the previous year (3.6). The most significant change in the ranking of girls' names was in the placement of the name Tahel, which rose from 45th place in 2009 to 12th place in 2010, and Ayala, which rose from the 30th place to the 14th place. 

Moslem names

Among Moslem boys there is no change in the popularity of names, and as in the past, the most common name was Muhammad. But among Moslem girls the most common name was Rimas, which was in 10th place last year and in 19th place in 2008. 


Notes

1  A household is defined as one person or a group of persons (having or not having a family relationship between them) living together in one apartment on a regular basis, most days of the week, and sharing a food expenditure budget. The households do not include children living on kibbutzim, in institutions, in student dormitories or outside localities (Bedouin in the south and others). Data source: Manpower Surveys, 2010.

2  Family is defined as two or more persons in one household, who are related as husband and wife, as parent and child, as an unmarried couple, as grandparent and grandchild (without its parent), or as siblings (without spouses or their own children). Data source: Manpower Surveys, 2010.

3  The data presented in this part were processed by the Central Bureau of Statistics based on a basic database from the Ministry of Welfare and the Social Services, which includes records of families registered with social services departments of the local authorities, in which neediness has been defined for at least one family member.

4  Neediness: the reason for which the individual applies to the social services departments.

 
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